Taiwan Mission Quarterly

 

Chinese Folk Religion

Volume 4 Number 3 (Winter 1995)

 

In This Issue

Christians in Taiwan are often looked upon as beingunfilial because they do not worship their ancestors. They are viewed as being unloving and uncaring because during funeral rites and during the mourning periodthey will not conform to accepted traditional practices and rituals. The deeply held belief in ancestor worship becomes a stumbling block to faith in Christ.

The question for Taiwanese Christians and for missionaries working to present the Gospel in Taiwan is to know how to worship onlythe one, true God in spirit and truth, while at the same time showing honor and respect for ancestors.

The first step is to understand the rites and rituals surrounding ancestor worship and folk religion in Taiwan. Gaining a deeper understanding of what these beliefs mean to the average Taiwanese will enable us to putthese rites into an understand-able framework.

Table of Content

Chinese Folk Religion

  • Taiwan's Ancestor Cult by Robert Bolton

  • Funerals in Taiwan: Our Personal Experiences by Greg Hunt

  • Tearing Down the Barrier of Ancestor Worship by Malcolm Feistel

  • Idol Removal by Stephen Khong

  • A Christian Response to Hakka Chinese Ancestor Practices by Joel Nordtvedt

  • The Taoist Pantheon and Worship in the Temples by Yues Raguin

 


 

  • Don't Leave Home Without It by Nathan D. Showalter

 


 

Regular Features

  • Living in Taiwan

  • Window on the Church in Taiwan

  • Language Learning Corner

  • Resources for Ministry

  • Computers in Ministry

  • MK Education




Taiwan Mission Quarterly

 

The Hakka

Volume 4 Number 4 (Spring 1995)

 

In This Issue

The Hakka people are a distinct ethnic Chinese people group. Descendants of the ancient Han Chinese, they are originally from the heart of old China but migrated in several phases to the south of China. There they settled as "guests" among those who preceded them. "Hakka" is the word for "guest people" in their own language ("Ke-jia" in Mandarin). Early in the eighteenth century many Hakkas migrated to Taiwan looking for new opportunities.

 Chinese migrants from the mainland province of Fukien (commonly known as the Minnan or Taiwanese people) preceded the Hakkas to Taiwan and had already gained control of the best land. Therefore the Hakkas settled mostly in the less desirable, hilly country of northern Taiwan. With a population of about three million, the Hakkas now make up 15 percent of Taiwan's population. 

Table of Content

The Hakka

  • Hakka Ministry: Are all Chinese the Same? by Joel Nordtvedt

  • Christian Witness to the Hakka People by the PCT by Paul McLean

  • Who is Looking for These Hidden People? by Jerry Cole

  • The World Hakka Evangelical Association by Michael Kittelson

 


 

  • I Thought We Were Starting All Over Again by Nathan D. Showalter

 


 

Regular Features

  • Window on the Church of Taiwan

  • Language Learning Corner

  • Resources for Ministry

  • Computers in Ministry

  • Living in Taiwan

  • Book Reviews

  • Women in Ministry



Taiwan Mission Quarterly

 

Tentmakers

Volume 5 Number 1 (Summer 1995)

 

In This Issue

The idea of combining missions and business is not a recent one. The Moravian church, as early as 1732 wedded ministry and business in the mission's outreach. The efforts made it financially feasible for man Moravians to spread the Gospel in America, India, Labrador, Surinam, and Africa. The Basel Mission Trading Company began in India in 1834. It successfully operated industrial commercial enterprises which supported missionary activity in India and later in Africa.

Combining missions and business has its roots in the outreach of the early church. Acts 18:1-4 tells us that Paul stayed with Aquila and Priscilla in Corinth and worked with them "because he was a tentmaker as they were." In Corinthians 9, Paul argued that he had a right to receive his living from preaching the Gospel. However, he did not always use this right. Instead, he and Barnabas worked for a living.

Table of Content

Tentmakers

  • Tentmakers: Mixing the Sacred and the Secular by D.E.

  • Tentmakers: Two Definitions

  • New Callings: New Terminology by Abel de Gogh

  • Toward an Effective Tentmaking Strategy by Chuck Foreman

  • The Experiences of One Tentmaker by Todd Sandell

  • A Study of the Parallels Between the Book of Ruth and Taiwanese Culture by Susan Lu Hsu

 


 

  • We Can Learn a Lot From Lot by Nathan D. Showalter

 


 

Regular Features

  • Resources for Ministry

  • Language Learning Corner

  • Book Reviews

  • Living in Taiwan




Taiwan Mission Quarterly

 

Cell Group Churches

Volume 5 Number 2 (Fall 1995)

 

In This Issue

Ralph Neighbour's book, Where Do We Go From Here?: A Guidebook for the Cell Group Church(See book review, page 61.), published in 1990, was the first comprehensive, practical guide on the cell group church. Encouraged by the book, a number of people set about to apply the principles to their existing churches. Others were emboldened to actually plant a cell group church.

One of the most significant influences in Taiwan regarding cell group churches was a trip made in 1994 by about 300 pastors, missionaries, and other church staff and lay people. These Christian workers went to Singapore to attend the Third International Cell Group Conference. For five days these men and womenlistened to Pastor Lawrence Khong, Dr. Ralph Neighbour, and their co-workers share on the practice and theory of cell groups. They also had the opportunity to actually participate in cell group meetings with the members of the Faith Community Baptist Church.

Table of Content

Cell Group Churches

  • A Bird's Eye View of the Global Cell Church Movement by Jim Egli

  • What is a Meta-Church? by Carl F. George

  • How New is Your Wineskin? Ralph W. Neighbour Jr.

  • Cell Groups and Renewal at Truth Lutheran Church by Wendell Friest

  • Transition: One Church's Journey into Cell Groups by Barry Owen

  • The Birth of a Cell Group Church by Thad Puckett

  • The Use of Networks for Church Planting in Taiwan by Joel Nordtvedt

 


 

Regular Features

  • Missionary Profiles: Sister Lilly Singer

  • Witness Stand: A Miracle of Snow

  • Language Learning Corner

  • Book Reviews

  • MK Education: Preparing Children for Boarding School




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