Taiwan Mission Quarterly

 

Going With the Gospel

Volume 2 Number 3 (Winter 1993)

 

In This Issue

Two thousand years ago, Jesus said, "GO, and preachthe Gospel." However, ever since then, most Christians have beensaying, "COME, and I'll preach the Gospel to you."

Asking people to come to where we are is, of course, more comfortable for us. For in our churches and English Bible classes, it is we who make the rules and it is up to those who come to fit in. Before they walked through the doors of our church (or home), they were the "insiders" in their culture. Now that they have stepped inside our door, they have become the "outsiders" and we have become the "insiders" (for it is we who make the rules).

There a re some people who a re Going with the Gospel, however - those who go to where the people are and seek to "pierce the darkness." It is to these missionaries that this issue of Taiwan Mission is dedicated. For, if two million Taiwanese are to be won for Christ by the year 2000, the church in Taiwan must break new ground.

Table of Content

Going With the Gospel

  • Going Where the Students Are by Angela Symonds

  • Going Where the People Are by Doug Vavrosky

  • Night Market Evangelism by Randy Adams

  • Evangelizing Taiwan's Factory Workers by Andy Frederiksen

  • Sports and Recreation Ministry by Alex Tan

  • Taiwan Evangelism Explosion by Chng Seng-hiong and David Alexander

 


 

  • Confrontation: Paul on the Mars' Hill of Taiwan by Alan Gates

 


 

Regular Features

  • Window on the Church in Taiwan

  • Resources for Ministry

  • Living in Taiwan

  • Book Reviews

  • Women in Ministry

  • MK Education

  • Language Learning Corner

  • Computers in Ministry


Taiwan Mission Quarterly

 

Is Taiwan Still a Mission Field?

Volume 2 Number 4 (Spring 1993)

 

In This Issue

Missionaries are still needed (and wanted!) in Taiwan, as the two largest people groups in Taiwan are still unreached. It is true that Taiwan's Indigenous people, who make up two percent of the population, are eighty percent Christian, and the Mainland Chinese who make up tenpercent of the population are ten percent Christian. However, the Taiwanese, who makeup seventy - four percent of the population, are only one percent Christian, while the Hakka, who make up fourteen percent of the population, are less than five - tenths of one percent (0.5%) Christian. By any definition, eighty - eight percent of Taiwan's population is unreached. It seems that the father of "people group" thinking has lost sight of Taiwan's two main people groups!

While it is true that there is a strong church in Taiwan, I believe that missionaries should be working as partners with Taiwanese believers in reaching the unreached Taiwanese and Hakka. Missionaries need to examine their strategy - especially which language they use to evangelize and the areas of Taiwan in which they choose to live. To say, "No one can deny them the privilege of reaching their own people," misses the point! Missionaries arenot needed to tend churches, but they are needed to work in partnership with Taiwan's churches and to help the church stretch out and reach the unreached - both here in Taiwan and around the world.

Table of Content

Is Taiwan Still a Mission Field?

  • Yes, Missionaries Are Still Needed by Phil Schwab

  • The Land Is Not Fully Possessed by Robert Bolton

  • We Are Here because Jesus Sent Us by Joel Taylor

  • The Mysterious Challenge to Today's Viable Church by Todd L. Sandel

  • Over and Out? by Martin Symonds

  • A Time for Evaluation by Howard Kenyon

  • The Completion of a Mission by Sheldon Sawatzky

  • God's Interpreters in Society by Greg Johnston

  • Toward a Theology of Withdrawal by Daniel J. Adams & Chou Fang-Lin

 

Regular Features

  • Window on the Church in Taiwan

  • Living in Taiwan

  • Computers in Ministry

  • Book Reviews

  • Women in Ministry

  • MK Education

  • Language Learning Corner


Taiwan Mission Quarterly

 

Missionary Families Encounter Culture

Volume 3 Number 1 (Summer 1993)

 

In This Issue

The TMF 1993 statistics reveal that missionary couples account for over 300 of the 520 missionary units listed in the TMF directory. In addition, there are nearly 390 dependents of missionary couples and singles livingamong us. Regardless of whether these families were "imported" or are "Made in Taiwan," these mothers, fathers, daughters and sons of all ages are faced with unique challenges and special opportunities as they learn to live together "across culture" here.

Our opening article, "Do Families Still Belong in Missions?" by Jim Reapsome, briefly deals with some of the questions being raised concerning involving families in mission from the perspective of a professional missionary writer. The "first person" articles tell what missionary families anticipated in first coming to Taiwan, and what they did to cope with the challenges and opportunities. Doug Habecker approaches the topic from the viewpoint of a returned MK, while Karen Neff tells how a "single" living in Taichung has put together her own "family" for fellowship, ministry and mutual support.

Table of Content

Missionary Families Encounter Culture

  • Do Families Still Fit in Missions? by Jim Reapsome

  • Families Encounter Culture by Martha Dwight, Beverly Skiles, Molly Johnston,Nan Sugg, Sharilyn Schorr, Joel and Marybeth Nordtvedt, and George McFall

  • An Unrivaled Blessing by Doug Habecker

  • Finding a Family by Karen Neff

 


 

  • Celebrations of Festivity by Robert Bolton

  • Introducing the Hakka Bible by Paul McLean

 


 

Regular Features

  • Windows on the Church in Taiwan

  • Living in Taiwan

  • Computers in Ministry

  • Book Reviews

  • Women in Ministry

  • MK Education

  • Language Learning Corner

  • Resources for Ministry


Taiwan Mission Quarterly

 

Power Encounter

Volume 3 Number 2 (Fall 1993)

 

In This Issue

From Old Testament times to the present, power encounter has advanced the mission of God for the redemption of humankind. Think of the power encounter when Elijah challenged the prophets of Baal on Mt. Carmel, or the remarkable story of Elisha and the Aramean armies when the servant's eyes were opened to see the hills full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha (2 Kings 6:17). Think of St. Boniface who felled the sacred tree of the German tribes, opening the door to their evangelization. Jesus in his ministry of proclaiming the Kingdom of God exhibited the power of God over evil and the demonic by healing the sick and casting out demons. In the end, his death on the cross utterly defeated Satan, giving him authority over all powers in heaven and on earth in order to draw all people to himself. As missionaries, we share that authority as we invite the people of Taiwan to trust the One who suffered for their release from the bondageof the power of evil.

This mission necessarily involves power encounter. "Power encounter" and "power evangelism" recently established themselves in our missiologica1 vocabulary. Often the church was more "truth conscious" than "power conscious." The renewed emphasis on signs and wonders, healing and exorcisms provides a corrective to this imbalance as we come to understand the confrontation of the Spirit with the demonic, evil forces in persons and structures. But with theemphasis on, power come new temptations: overconfidence in predicting the powerof the Spirit, regarding the non-Christian as the enemy, a proneness to pride, misuse of spiritual gifts and wanting to be in control instead of submitting to God. If we can expect too little from the Spirit, we can also expect too much. The ManilaManifesto provides a helpful perspective: "We reject skepticism which denies miracles and the prescriptions which demands them, both the timidity which shrinks from the fullness of the Spirit and the triumphalism which shrinks from the weakness in which Christ's power is made perfect." In other words, we should not deny miracles of power nor demand them, but trust the sovereign power of God, which also works through the power of forgiveness, reconciliation, love, holiness, humility and suffering to open unconverted hearts and build churches.

Table of Content

Power Encounter

  • Formidable "Powers" but a Mighty Deliverer ! by Robert Bolton

  • Spiritual Warfare: Biblical Perspectives by Paul Hiebert

  • Power Encounter: Do We Need It ? by Rob Sugg

  • Conflict and Conquest Book Synopsis by Wayne Schock

  • Interview with Bob Overgaard by Phil Schwab

  • Beware the Devil - Devotional by Ruth and Mark Harbour

 


 

Regular Features

  • Window on the Church in Taiwan

  • Women in Ministry

  • MK Education

  • Book Reviews

  • Computers in Ministry

  • Resources for Ministry

  • Language Learning Corner


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